Clerk of the Magistrates from 1836 onwards

Clerk of the Magistrates from 1836 onwards

Postby pitano1 » Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:15 pm

i found this an interesting read.
the financial administration of trusts..eh. :wink:
your local council.. :wink:
more interesting info for the winter reading
here..http://globe-union-court.org/info_law_trust/trusts_contents.htm


The clerk is responsible for the paperwork associated with any matter, including the financial administration associated with trusts, ensuring such transaction remain secret in accordance with their secret oath of office that is in perpetual conflict with any public oath. Clerks are also responsible for the preparation of official documents of the court and their transmission.
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A Clerk is an Office invested with certain custodial and administrative authority to which one is appointed by solemn oath to assist in the administration and services of a Juridic Person according to its policies also known as “statutes”.

The origin of the Clerk
The word Clerk is a shortened derivative of the Ecclesiastical word Cleric from the 13th Century Latin word Claricus meaning “Roman priest possessing administrative skills and powers” or literally “One who belongs to the clarus” with the word clarus meaning “illumination of sight, clear voice and sound mind”. The claim that the word originates from ancient Greek is a complete fabrication of the 15th and 16th Century.

In 1275/1276 Rudolph I Hapsburg in Switzerland and Edward I of England with the assistance of AntiPope Gregory X (1271-1276) simultaneously declared "usury" or the charging of interest and financial transactions -- vital for trade and business for thousands of years -- a mortal sin for any Christian punishable by death and then proceeded to place all financial and banking transactions in the hands of “Jewish” Khazar/Magyar families from Venice and Genoa by appearing to “press-gang” them into the service of the Roman Cult as the infamous servi camerae ("serfs of the treasury"). Thus the greatest financial monopoly system in Civilized history was born as an unholy organized crime alliance that has continued until this present day.
While the public were only permitted to now deal exclusively with Khazar/Magyar banking families for all their financial transactions now able to charge extraordinary amounts of interest, compared to the ancient limit of three percent, the Roman Cult developed a private interface with the servi camerae ("serfs of the treasury") called the cancellorum, later called the “chancery” meaning barrier, grating or enclosure administered by a claricus or simply a “clerk”.

The Chancery was both a legal barrier, an interface to the servi camerae as well as a physical place within a church, usually behind the main altar and the site of various shrines. It was here that the claricus or “clerk” would sit and perform the ecclesiastical financial duties of the church such as the sale of indulgences. Over time as the sophistication of indulgences grew into forms of Bills, Promissory Notes, Certificates and other instruments, the clerk was granted a permanent “office” particularly in the development of permanent Roman law courts.


The role and powers of the clerk of courts
The literal definition of “court” in the context of a Roman Court is the Latin word cautio meaning a place controlled by a private (Roman) guild for the production of bailments, securities and bonds. Thus the role of a Roman Court has always depended on the skills and loyalty of an ecclesiastical claricus or “clerk”.

The clerk is responsible for the paperwork associated with any matter, including the financial administration associated with trusts, ensuring such transaction remain secret in accordance with their secret oath of office that is in perpetual conflict with any public oath. Clerks are also responsible for the preparation of official documents of the court and their transmission.

However, the clerk also possesses extraordinary powers as custodian of the names and rolls of a district or region consistent with the history of the clerk as a senior administrative official of local communities.

In 1834, British Parliament introduced the Poor Law Amendment Act (1834) which reorganized Church of England parishes into unions which were then be responsible for the poor in their area and administered by a Board of Poor Law Guardians, also known as the Board of Guardians. The Board was assisted by a new office known as the Clerk of the Board of Guardians, also known as the “Clerk of the Guardians” being an additional title granted to the existing local Clerk of the Peace responsible for administering the records and matters of the Magistrates Court of the area.

The Clerk of the Peace, assuming the powers of Clerk of the Guardians as well as Clerk of the Magistrates from 1836 onwards was granted even greater power as the Registrar of the Court of Record and responsible for the accurate recording of births, deaths, marriages and events within the parish union. Importantly, the Clerk of the Guardians was said to be “in custody” of all persons on the poor rolls on account of their name being registered at birth.

From 1871 onwards, the Board of Guardians and Clerk of Guardians were granted even more guardian responsibilities with the creation of “districts” called Sanitary Districts governed by a Sanitary Authority responsible for various public health matters including mental health legally known as “sanity” through the Local Government Act of 1871, Public Health Act 1872 and Public Health Act 1875. The Boards of Guardians and Clerk of Guardians were also granted guardianship over minors through the Guardianship of Infants Acts 1886 and 1925.

Significantly, from 1879 with the Summary Jurisdiction Act (1879), the Clerk of the Peace, also known as the Clerk of the Guardians, also known as the Clerk of the Magistrates, also known as the Registrar of the Court of Record was granted the powers of the Clerk of the Privy Council as their agent for summary judgment matters. Thus when the Clerk of the Magistrates or their agent such as a Justices’ Clerk issued a summons or warrant under Crown seal, the matter could be handled as a summary judgment simply by evoking these extraordinary powers over all subjects, regardless of whether they were poor, insane or a minor.

In 1929 in the United Kingdom with the Local Government Act (1929), the Boards of Guardians as well as the position of Clerk of Guardians were finally “abolished” by allocating their powers to a different office:

(i) Board of Guardians became Council of a County or Borough; and

(ii) Clerk to the Guardians became Clerk of the County Council or Town Clerk; and

(iii) Guardian as an individual became a member of the Council of a County or Borough; and

(iv) Poor Law Union became a County or Borough.

In most western countries following Roman Cult law and English law, the Town Clerk remains effectively the “Clerk of the Guardians”, the “Clerk of the Peace”, the “Agent of the Clerk of the Privy Council”, the “Clerk of the Magistrates” and “Registrar of the Court of Record” with the Justices’ Clerks of Magistrates Courts their agent possessing the claimed power to conclude summary judgments.

Based on the continued claimed powers of the Clerk and their agents, a Magistrates Court is effectively a Court of Wards and Guardians with a hearing effectively either "examination" or a "summary judgment" for petty matters limited by cost and penalty.

Upon the presumptions of power claimed by the Clerks, when one attends a Roman law Magistrates Court, it is presumed one has consented to being treated as a Ward unless such presumptions are rejected before attendance or immediately upon being brought forcibly before the Magistrates Court.

this is their public oath,but do they swear another..

30A.020 Oath of clerk and deputies.
Every clerk and deputy, in addition to the oath prescribed by Section 228 of the Constitution, shall, before entering on the duties of his office, take the following oath in presence of the Circuit Court: "I, ....., do swear that I will well and truly discharge the duties of the office of .............. County Circuit Court clerk, according to the best of my skill and judgment, making the due entries and records of all orders, judgments, decrees, opinions and proceedings of the court, and carefully filing and preserving in my office all books and papers which come to my possession by virtue of my office; and that I will not knowingly or willingly commit any malfeasance of office, and will faithfully execute the duties of my office without favor, affection or partiality, so help me God." The fact that the oath has been administered shall be entered on the record of the Circuit Court.
Effective: January 2, 1978
History: Created 1976 (1st Extra. Sess.) Ky. Acts ch. 21, sec. 2, effective January 2,
If the machine of government is of such a nature that it requires you to be the agent of injustice to another, then, I say, break the law.
Henry David Thoreau
ALL UNALIENABLE RIGHTS RESERVED -AB INITIO - Without Recourse - Non-Assumpsit
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Re: Clerk of the Magistrates from 1836 onwards

Postby holy vehm » Wed Oct 31, 2012 9:24 pm

Nice find, shared about :wink:
"A ruler who violates the law is illegitimate. He has no right to be obeyed. His commands are mere force and coercion. Rulers who act lawlessly, whose laws are unlawful, are mere criminals".
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Re: Clerk of the Magistrates from 1836 onwards

Postby Dreadlock » Thu Nov 01, 2012 1:25 am

Yeah, interesting website. Good info. Cheers.
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