Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Re: Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Postby Scott Sando » Mon May 18, 2009 1:06 pm

I'm on the same page with you guyes on these issues , I notice when i'm on other websites there is a hell of alot of people how have too much fear and to much respect for another authority other the themselves.Crazy.
People like to look up to so called experts, they never trust themselves, and anyway as I always tell people everything is simple if its not its there to confuse and cause apathy.
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Re: Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Postby Veronica » Mon May 18, 2009 1:09 pm

Yup. You got it!
Freedom's just another word for: "Nothing left to lose" (Janis Joplin)
"There is no path to peace, peace IS the path" (Mahatma Ghandi)
"There is no path to freedom, freedom IS the path" (Veronica Chapman)
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Re: Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Postby BaldBeardyDude » Mon May 18, 2009 1:23 pm

Indeed, m8 - trust yourself first and foremost - most of us know what is right.

The authorities think might is right - but we KNOW different we know right is might :grin: :clap:
They must find it hard to take Truth for authority who have so long mistaken Authority for Truth - Gerald Massey
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Re: Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Postby Scott Sando » Mon May 18, 2009 1:26 pm

I'm glad my friend told me to view this site as it seems more intuitive the other websites on freeman stuff.
goodlike stuff.
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Re: Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Postby Veronica » Mon May 18, 2009 1:31 pm

Scott Sando wrote:I'm glad my friend told me to view this site as it seems more intuitive the other websites on freeman stuff.
goodlike stuff.

Well ... we like to think we are. We like to think we don't have egos, and just post the contents of our heads. It seems to work.
Freedom's just another word for: "Nothing left to lose" (Janis Joplin)
"There is no path to peace, peace IS the path" (Mahatma Ghandi)
"There is no path to freedom, freedom IS the path" (Veronica Chapman)
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Re: Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Postby Scott Sando » Mon May 18, 2009 1:38 pm

Thats the great thing about the freeman movement, it requires that if you want to be a freeman, you take control of your life. How can the illuminati stand up the worlds population saying, I run my own life mate.
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Re: Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Postby Veronica » Mon May 18, 2009 1:48 pm

Scott Sando wrote:How can the illuminati stand up the worlds population saying, I run my own life mate.

All we have to do it to get to a critical mass.

And that MUST happen in time.

Because once you "know" ... you can NEVER "unknow".

Everyone who "finds out"/"wakes up" is then on our side FOR EVER AND A DAY. (And so are their children & so on)

(The only question is: Do we have enough time? And there's only one way to find out ... that's by keepin' on keepin' on)
Freedom's just another word for: "Nothing left to lose" (Janis Joplin)
"There is no path to peace, peace IS the path" (Mahatma Ghandi)
"There is no path to freedom, freedom IS the path" (Veronica Chapman)
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Re: Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Postby Scott Sando » Mon May 18, 2009 1:51 pm

Thats the spirit, life a game, lets have fun while where here. lets not take people seriously how want to try and be our betters, their mental
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Re: Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Postby Veronica » Mon May 18, 2009 1:57 pm

Scott Sando wrote:lets have fun

We do that ... as you'll see.

We do that in spades.
Freedom's just another word for: "Nothing left to lose" (Janis Joplin)
"There is no path to peace, peace IS the path" (Mahatma Ghandi)
"There is no path to freedom, freedom IS the path" (Veronica Chapman)
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Re: Free Blacks Law Dictionary

Postby MrFrodo » Tue Aug 04, 2009 3:37 pm

Glad I found this thread as I have become concerned over some of the initial information I came across via the likes of Rob Menard(he may still be right based on the definition he found).

I downloaded blacks 1& 2 and had a look in bouviers 1856 and found that some of the defiinitions such as registration, person, statute were nothing like described by Rob Menard (again let me emphasis he was probably reading from a more upto date version)

REGISTRATION -

blacks 2nd edition says; recording; inserting into an offial register; the act of making a list, catelogue, schedule, or register particularly of an official character, or of making entries therein

PERSON -

Blacks 2nd edition says; A man considered to the rank he holds in society, with all the rights to which the place he holds entitles him, and the duties with which it imposes him.
Bouviers says; PERSON. This word is applied to men, women and children, who are called natural persons. In law, man and person are not exactly-synonymous terms. Any human being is a man, whether he be a member of society or not, whatever may be the rank he holds, or whatever may be his age, sex, &c. A person is a man considered according to the rank he holds in society, with all the rights to which the place he holds entitles him, and the duties which it imposes. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 137.

2. It is also used to denote a corporation which is an artificial person. 1 Bl. Com. 123; 4 Bing. 669; C. 33 Eng. C. L R. 488; Wooddes. Lect. 116; Bac. Us. 57; 1 Mod. 164.

3. But when the word "Persons" is spoken of in legislative acts, natural persons will be intended, unless something appear in the context to show that it applies to artificial persons. 1 Scam. R. 178.

4. Natural persons are divided into males, or men; and females or women. Men are capable of all kinds of engagements and functions, unless by reasons applying to particular individuals. Women cannot be appointed to any public office, nor perform any civil functions, except those which the law specially declares them capable of exercising. Civ. Code of Louis. art. 25.

5. They are also sometimes divided into free persons and slaves. Freemen are those who have preserved their natural liberty, that is to say, who have the right of doing what is not forbidden by the law. A slave is one who is in the power of a master to whom he belongs. Slaves are sometimes ranked not with persons but things. But sometimes they are considered as persons for example, a negro is in contemplation of law a person, so as to be capable of committing a riot in conjunction with white men. 1 Bay, 358. Vide Man.

6. Persons are also divided into citizens, (q. v.) and aliens, (q. v.) when viewed with regard to their political rights. When they are considered in relation to their civil rights, they are living or civilly dead; vide Civil Death; outlaws; and infamous persons.

7. Persons are divided into legitimates and bastards, when examined as to their rights by birth.

8. When viewed in their domestic relations, they are divided into parents and children; hushands and wives; guardians and wards; and masters and servants son, as it is understood in law, see 1 Toull. n. 168; 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 1890, note.

ARTIFICIAL PERSON -

Blacks 2nd edition says; such are as created and devised by law for the purposes of society and government, called "corporations" or "bodies politic"

NATURAL PERSONS -

Blacks 2nd edition says; Such as are formed by nature as distinguished from artificial persons or corporations


STATUTE -

Blacks 2nd ---I'm not typing that out!!
Bouviers says; The written will of the legislature, solemnly expressed according to the forms prescribed in the constitution; an act of the legislature.

2. This word is used in contradistinction to the common law. Statutes acquire their force from the time of their passage unless otherwise provided. 7 Wheat. R. 104: 1 Gall . R. 62.

3. It is a general rule that when the provision of a statute is general, everything which is necessary to make such provision effectual is supplied by the common law; Co. Litt. 235; 2 Inst. 222; Bac. Ab. h. t. B; and when a power is given by statute, everything necessary for making it effectual is given by implication: quando le aliquid concedit, concedere videtur et id pe quod devenitur ad aliud. 12 Co. 130, 131 2 Inst. 306.

4. Statutes are of several kinds; namely, Public or private. 1. Public statutes are those of which the judges will take notice without pleading; as, those which concern all officers in general; acts concerning trade in general or any specific trade; acts concerning all persons generally. 2. Private acts, are those of which the judges wiil not take notice without pleading; such as concern only a particular species, or person; as, acts relating to any particular place, or to several particular places, or to one or several particular counties. Private statutes may be rendered public by being so declared by the legislature. Bac. Ab. h. t. F; 1 Bl. Com. 85. Declaratory or remedial. 1. A declaratory statute is one which is passed in order to put an end to a doubt as to what the common law is, and which declares what it is, and has ever been. 2. Remedial statutes are those which are made to supply such defects, and abridge such superfluities in the common law as may have been discovered. 1 Bl. Com. 86. These remedial statutes are themselves divided into enlarging statutes, by which the common law is made more comprehensive and extended than it was before; and into restraining statutes, by which it is narrowed down to that which is just and proper. The term remedial statute is also applied to those acts which give the party injured a remedy, and in some respects those statutes are penal. Esp. Pen. Act. 1.

6. Temporary or perpetual. 1. A temporary statute is one which is limited in its duration at the time of its enactment. It continues in force until the time of its limitation has expired, unless sooner repealed. 2. A perpetual statute is one for the continuance of which there is no limited time, although it be not expressly declared to be so. If, however, a statute which did not itself contain any limitation, is to be governed by another which is temporary only, the former will also be temporary and dependent upon the existence of the latter. Bac. Ab. h. t. D.

7. Affirmative or negative. 1. An affirmative statute is one which is enacted in affirmative terms; such a statute does not take away the common law. If, for example, a statute without negative words, declares that when certain requisites shall have been complied with, deeds shall, have in evidence a certain effect, this does not prevent their being used in evidence, though the requisites have not been complied with, in the same manner as they might have been before the statute was passed. 2 Cain. R. 169. 2. A negative statute is one expressed in negative terms, and so controls the common law, that it has no force in opposition to the statute. Bro. Parl. pl. 72; Bac. Ab. h. t. G.

8. Penal statutes are those which order or prohibit a thing under a certain penalty. Esp. Pen. Actions, 5 Bac. Ab. h. t. I, 9. Vide, generally, Bac. Ab. h. t.; Com. Dig. Parliament; Vin. Ab. h. t.; Dane's Ab. Index, h. t.; Chit. Pr. Index, h. t.; 1 Kent, Com. 447-459; Barrington on the Statutes, Boscaw. on Pen. Stat.; Esp. on Penal Actions and Statutes.

9. Among the civilians, the term statute is generally applied to all sorts of laws and regulations; every provision of law which ordains, permits, or prohibits anything is a statute without considering from what source it arises. Sometimes the word is used in contradistinction to the imperial Roman law, which, by way of eminence, civilians call the common law. They divide statutes into three classes, personal, real and mixed.

10. Personal statutes are those which have principally for their object the person, and treat of property only incidentally; such are those which regard birth, legitimacy, freedom, the fight of instituting suits, majority as to age, incapacity to contract, to make a will, to plead in person, and the like. A personal statute is universal in its operation, and in force everywhere.

11. Real statutes are those which have principally for their object, property, and which do not speak of persons, except in relation to property; such are those which concern the disposition, which one may make of his property either alive or by testament. A real statute, unlike a personal one, is confined in its operation to the country of its origin.

12. Mixed statutes are those which concern at once both persons and property. But in this sense almost all statutes are mixed, there being scarcely any law relative to persons, which does not at the same time relate to things. Vide Merl. Repert. mot Statut; Poth. Cout. d'Orleans, ch. 1; 17 Martin's Rep. 569-589; Story's Confl. of Laws, 12, et seq.; Bouv. Inst. Index, h. t.
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