Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Postby OneManAndHisDog » Wed Jan 13, 2010 9:44 pm

"registration" is the process of entrusting a right or property, in Trust


Imagine that you have a real concrete object, lets call it object A, and that you have claim to that object (such as natural claim of the creator in which it had been created on your own cognizance - as a sovereign and one of the People) or you have true legal title to that object (through transfer from someone else who held true claim at some point and was wishing to transfer it fully).

You have object A at law, it is yours true, clear and outright.


Now imagine that you "register" object A with some one or some created Body.

The "registration" of that object transfers true legal title to that Body to be entrusted.

The Body is then entrusted to administer that object at law.

Thus agents / members / trustees of the Body are bound with fiduciary duty to administer the Body's possessions at law for the benefit of the Beneficiary.

You then gain equitable benefit of object A as part of that Trust and are no longer burdened by its administration at law.

Now consider, the "object" I mentioned above doesn't necessarily have to be real and tanigble (concreta), but can be intangible. To be specific, the object may be a tangible or intangible right or property, so long as true claim or true legal title is held to it. I.e Ownership exists at law.


The Body may then do the following if the "registration" process with the Body includes it, depending on the Body and what is being registered...


The Body creates a separate 'entity' that re-presents that object.

The Body, being the natural creator of this 'entity', has full claim to it and thus holds true legal title to its creation.

An 'entity' is something that has a distinct, separate existence, though it need not be a material existence. In particular, abstractions and legal fictions are usually regarded as entities.

(Aside: In various fields of study, such 'entities' could be abstract entities or abstract objects, the important thing here being the abstract nature of it.)

The 'entity' is transferred and entrusted to you (as occurring mutually in the "registration" process).

You are then entrusted to administer that 'entity' at law.

Thus you are bound with fiduciary duty to administer your possessions at law for the benefit of the Beneficiary (not you).

They then gain equitable benefit of the 'entity' as part of that Trust and are no longer burdened by its administration at law, whereas you are bound under that Trust relationship to administer it according to the jurisdictional "Law" under which you are holding it in Trust - i.e. the Statutes / Acts etc. that comprise that Trust relationship.


In essence, a mutual Trust or dual Trust is established...

Your object A is given into Trust and they become bound to administer that object at law, whereas you may enjoy the benefit thereof.
Their created 'entity' is taken into Trust and you become bound to administer that entity at law, whereas they may enjoy the benefit thereof.

There is a mutual and reciprocal binding in Trust (in Equity), and also enough consideration to make it thoroughly binding at law (common law).

As the Beneficiary of one, you may hold them accountable for mis-adminstration of the object, and as the Trustee of the other, they may hold you accountable for mis-administration of the 'entity' that is entrusted in return in the mirror or mutual Trust.


Note.

In short, before any kind of "registration", you may hold the object or entity true, clear and outright, i.e. have true claim to it, or equally true legal title to it. (Technically, "title" appears when things start to be traded, such as a car bought from a company.)

After something is placed in Trust (such as the process of "registration" which implied the establishment of a Trust), then there are two types of 'ownership' of property simultaneous in existence; true legal title at law, and equitable title in equity.

o Todd & Willson's Textbook on Trusts by Sarah Wilson, Oxford University Press. (Now in 9th Edition, ISBN 978-0-19-955308-2)

For establishing your own Trust for your and your family's benefit that isn't under someone else's "Law" (e.g. Statutes, Acts, Codes etc. of a Society), then see here...
o A brief overview of creating your own Trust at law


In short...

You, as true claimant and/or legal title holder to object A wish to "register" it with a Body.

The Body creates entity A that merely re-presents object A.

True legal title to object A is transferred to the Body, and true legal title to entity A is transferred to you - a fair trade with consideration.

A mutual Trust is established, binding both parties, mutually for the benefit of both parties.

They are entrusted and bound with duty to administer object A at law for the Beneficiary, and you are entrusted and bound with duty to administer entity A at law for the Beneficiary.


Example 1: Cars - Motor Vehicles; what happens when we register...

Imagine you have a car (created by yourself, as one of the People, on your own cognizance, and thus hare natural claim to it) or pay to buy a car and wish to take true legal title to it (equivalent to taking full claim from another Body at law) and thus have it true, clear and outright.

The true claimant (or equally, the true legal title owner) to a car at law decides to "register" that car with a Body.

As part of the "registration" process, the Body creates a legal-fiction / legal-entity known as a 'Motor Vehicle' (and so has true claim to it - true, clear and outright - as they created this fiction that you then accept as fact).

(Note. "Fact" is establish as agreement between two parties.)

The 'Motor Vehicle' (in a different jurisdiction) merely re-presents the car (at law). - In the initial state, you have true claim to the real car, they have true claim to the legal fiction and legal entity known as the 'Motor Vehicle'.

The right and true legal title to the car is surrendered / transferred to the Body that is entrusted to administer the car at law.

The Body (effectively a Trust) holds the car at law, for the benefit of the Beneficiary.

The employees of the Body (the Trustees) are bound with fiduciary duty to administer the car at law.

In reverse, the legal title to the 'Motor Vehicle' is transferred to yourself and you become entrusted to administer the 'Motor Vehicle' at law.

You then hold the 'Motor Vehicle' at law, for the benefit of the Beneficiary.

You become an effective Trustee and become bound with fiduciary duty to administer the 'Motor Vehicle' at law.


The beneficiary of that administration of the created 'Motor Vehicle' that you hold may then hold you accountable to the "Laws" (Statutes, Acts, Codes, Rules, Regulations etc.) under which you stand in Trust if you fail to administer the 'Motor Vehicle' correctly - i.e. in the claimed case of "breach of trust".

Waiving the benefits as the Beneficiary of one Trust (in which they are entrusted to administer the car at law for your benefit) has no effect on your duty to perform as Trustee in administering the 'Motor Vehicle' in the mirror Trust for them or the fiction known as the "public" that they are entrusted to protect at law.

The only way out would be to offload your duties as Trustee to administer the 'Motor Vehicle', which is very difficult as the trust is perpetual, or to initially avoid surrendering the true claim / true legal title in the first place and avoid establishing a dual trust / mutual trust relationship through the process of "registration".

Another way is to establish your own Trust for your own household to manage your own affairs, and register it as part of your Trust under your own "Law" for the enjoyment of your family. Any party infringing on this will then be a third party intervener and will be hindering you in your duty, which is easier to establish than your lack of standing with respect to their Trust (though it can be done).


Example 2: People / Newborn human beings - persons/children...

Imagine you have a newborn ( - a real flesh & blood human being and one of the people).

If you "register" your newborn offspring, then you surrender right at law to raise the newborn to the Body with which you "register" it.

As part of the "registration" process, the Body creates a legal-fiction / legal-entity known as a 'child' (and so has true claim to it - true, clear and outright).

The 'child' (in a different jurisdiction) merely re-presents the right to raise the newborn human being (at law). - In the initial state, you have true claim to the right to raise the real newborn human being, they have true claim to the legal fiction and legal entity known as the 'child' - a "status".

The word "child" only re-presents a "status" that is then associated with the newborn human being with your agreement establishing it "in fact".

The legal title to raise and protect the 'child' is transferred to yourself and you become entrusted to administer the 'child' at law according to their "Law" under which it (the fictional status accepted as fact) is entrusted (i.e. the Statutes, Acts, Codes, etc.).

You then hold the 'child' at law, for the benefit of the Beneficiary - the State.

You become an effective Trustee and become bound with fiduciary duty to administer the 'child' at law.

Failure to raise the entrusted fiction status - the 'child' - according to the "Law" under which it was entrusted results in the Beneficiary of that child (the State) holding you accountable in court for "breach of Trust" (i.e. you failed to follow xyz Statute or Act or whatever they state).

Being found guilty, the infant human being is then taken away according to law, to which they hold true legal title to to raise, once the Trust has already been broken by you.


Again, it is possible to establish your own family Trust, standing on your own cognizance as one of the People, and not including by reference or adhesion any statute, act or other "foreign" man-made positive "Law" (see overview of creating your own Trust).


I have gathered this from studying the law, common law and trusts & equity, looking at a large number of cases in a number of common law countries, and especially those that try to challenge the nature of the trust and why the "waiving the benefits" also fails to work under certain circumstances, i.e. where there is an implied mutual or mirror Trust in place and your are bound to serve with fiduciary duty thereunder.

Please question me on any of this. The biggest test is to see if any one can put a hold in any of the reasoning, and brings us closer to the establishing the truth.

Other notes on Trusts...
o Registration of a right or property establishing it in Trust
o Fundamentals of Trusts


PS.

A Body's possessions are the rights and properties entrusted to it, through one of three general ways; (1) the initial constituting of the Body / Society / Trust, by constitution, charter, covenant, trust document etc., (2) orders placed on the trust by the Beneficiary, expanding the original trust document, thereby resulting in bills on its trustees, or (3) the individual "registration" of new rights and properties into the Body.

( Fundamentals of the common law etc. (1-5) )
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Re: Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Postby Jim » Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:16 pm

Good stuff, 1M&HD.

The biggest test is to see if any one can put a hold in any of the reasoning

What do you mean by this?

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Re: Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Postby OneManAndHisDog » Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:35 pm

Jim wrote:
The biggest test is to see if any one can put a hold in any of the reasoning

What do you mean by this?

A hole, not a hold. Typo. :thinks:

...if you can find I have made a mistake in my reasoning somewhere or you have some evidence to the contrary, then I'd be happy to hear so we can again de-construct and re-construct a model of what is occurring.

This is the collective result of our research groups in England and Japan by the way, thanks to the guys in the US & Canada too.
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Re: Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Postby huntingross » Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:48 pm

I really feel it is time for me to focus on trusts but always seem to be side tracked onto some other cause......they seem like the right thing to do.

An excellent read....no holes that I can see.
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Re: Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Postby Jim » Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:55 pm

Ah. Makes much more sense now :)

I've been reading a bit about trusts on the HMRC website (Trusts: the basics). I figured I would try and get the basics from the horse's mouth so to speak before investigating trust technology for myself. I think to claim the true legal title to your car, for example, you would need to dissolve any invisible trusts associated with being the REGISTERED KEEPER...

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Re: Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Postby OneManAndHisDog » Wed Jan 13, 2010 11:01 pm

huntingross wrote:I really feel it is time for me to focus on trusts but always seem to be side tracked onto some other cause......they seem like the right thing to do.

An excellent read....no holes that I can see.


The book by Sarah Wilson, Professor of Law at the University of Manchester is a very good introduction to trusts & equity - the first chapter explains how trusts & equity naturally came out of common law as a natural progression of the limitations of common law and contract.

Contract general binds with obligations one-to-one and requires the meeting of minds, and is thus limited.
Trusts occur as a natural outgrowth from common law and allows the entrusted party to be bound by fiduciary duty to serve as he established his duty from his words or actions, for example accepting to hold something (in trust) then you become entrusted in holding that thing - no contract, but a binding with duty due to trusts & equity.

This is as strong a binding and even more invisible if you are not aware of it.

The books is also a good introduction to the two forms of ownership that arise when something is put into Trust. Then the "ownership" is split into two simultaneous forms; legal title at law, and equitable title (or "lessor" or "use" title) in equity.

Also, there's a scary part of trusts but which is reasonable correct... the Trustee doesn't even have to be aware that he is a Trustee, but only one party needs to know that there is a trust in place (i.e. a Beneficiary holding the Trustee accountable). This is reasonable (although scary) if you follow through that he became a Trustee by using some right or property that wasn't his, and so became entrusted to use it properly (according to the true claimant of that right or property) - according to his "Law", whatever he decides at the time.

Thus when using something that isn't yours, and the terms and conditions are not advertised, then you should always make claim of right to use it before using it, and if no object is made then they cannot later claim that it was entrusted under their "Law" and that you had assumed a Trustee role to serve them regarding the use of that right or property.

When you go into court, they may thus apply their "Law" onto you regarding the right or property that has been "registered". It's all Trust and holding the Trustee accountable (even though he may not realize it as only one party needs cognition of the Trust) to the Beneficiary (usually the claimant).
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Re: Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Postby OneManAndHisDog » Wed Jan 13, 2010 11:09 pm

Jim wrote:I've been reading a bit about trusts on the HMRC website (Trusts: the basics). I figured I would try and get the basics from the horse's mouth so to speak before investigating trust technology for myself. I think to claim the true legal title to your car, for example, you would need to dissolve any invisible trusts associated with being the REGISTERED KEEPER...

Also, to know the difference between the car, and the 'Motor Vehicle'. The two are not the same.

It's easy if you get full legal title (claim) to your car to start with, and don't entrust it / register it, or if you declare that you put it in your own Trust holding.

But on de-registering, this is not easy. We have discussed this but it is still debatable.

Dissolving the trust is exactly the problem, you can easily dissolve one trust (where you are the beneficiary), but as you are entrusted as the Trustee of the mirror Trust with fiduciary duties thereof, you cannot dispense with your duties that you have quite voluntarily taken on.

We're still heavily research into case law of the obligations of Trustees. There's no easy way out to throw in the towel and stop performing as a Trustee.

You, as a trustee of the mirror Trust, are entrusted to administer the 'Motor Vehicle' at law for their benefit (or the benefit of the fiction known as the "public" that they administer and are entrusted to protect, i.e. can sue you when you fail to perform for the "public" benefit - "breach of trust").
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Re: Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Postby mosupply » Thu Jan 14, 2010 12:55 am

Hi,
this is my first post. This seems like a mostly UK forum as I reside in the U.S., but Im sure things are quite similar in both countries. I recently purchased a vehicle in cash from a man. He signed over his Nevada state title to me and I was wondering if there is any way I can switch the title from a state title to a "something else" title. I do not wish to register my car. And without license plates can an officer haul me to jail and impound my car? remedies? I have been reading up on freeman for a while now. I would like to take some action in lawful rebellion.

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Re: Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Postby emmanualgoldstein » Thu Jan 14, 2010 1:01 am

Theres been a few successes in canada running under "freeman plates" which are noticed to the care registeration authority but not in the "fill out an application form for registration plates" kind of process. The [url]worldfreemansociety.org[/url] has a forum with lots of americans but mostly canadians who are doing a lawful rebellion type of thing. Check it out.
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Re: Registration - the process of entrusting a right or property

Postby Jim » Thu Jan 14, 2010 8:38 pm

OneManAndHisDog wrote:
Jim wrote:I've been reading a bit about trusts on the HMRC website (Trusts: the basics). I figured I would try and get the basics from the horse's mouth so to speak before investigating trust technology for myself. I think to claim the true legal title to your car, for example, you would need to dissolve any invisible trusts associated with being the REGISTERED KEEPER...

Also, to know the difference between the car, and the 'Motor Vehicle'. The two are not the same.

Indeed. I used the word "car" very deliberately :)

You, as a trustee of the mirror Trust, are entrusted to administer the 'Motor Vehicle' at law for their benefit (or the benefit of the fiction known as the "public" that they administer and are entrusted to protect, i.e. can sue you when you fail to perform for the "public" benefit - "breach of trust").

So the REGISTERED KEEPER and the DVLA are both beneficiaries and trustees in a mirror trust? I can see how both persons fulfill both roles. In one trust relationship DVLA is the trustee with a duty to protect "the public" while the REGISTERED KEEPER is the beneficiary with equitable title to the VEHICLE (and, therefore, free use of it). In the mirror trust relationship DVLA is the beneficiary entitled to claim Vehicle Excise Duty (among other forms of taxation) while the REGISTERED KEEPER is the trustee with a duty to maintain the car in a roadworthy state and satisfy the statutory obligations associated with being a DRIVER.

Assuming I'm not too far from the mark then could the key to "de-registration" be proving that DVLA has breached the trust (failed in its fiduciary duty) and thereby claiming the right to dissolve the trust?
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